Floodpath: The Deadliest Man-Made Disaster of 20th-Century America and the Making of Modern Los Angeles

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Bloomsbury Press #ad - It was a horrific catastrophe, yet one which today is virtually forgotten. With research gathered over more than two decades, award-winning writer and filmmaker Jon Wilkman revisits the deluge that claimed nearly five hundred lives. Amazon book of the Year"Floodpath attempts to rescue the disaster from obscurity.

In an era of climate change, and a neglected American infrastructure, increasing demand on water resources, the tragedy of the St. But the failure of the St. Francis dam remains an urgent lesson about our human limits, all but forgotten today. Just before midnight on March 12, 1928, the St. The author captures many heartbreaking stories of survivors.

Floodpath: The Deadliest Man-Made Disaster of 20th-Century America and the Making of Modern Los Angeles #ad - Francis dam, releasing a devastating flood that roared fifty-four miles to the Pacific Ocean, suddenly collapsed, a twenty-story-high concrete structure just fifty miles north of Los Angeles, destroying everything in its path. Francis Dam has never been more relevant. The effect is powerful. The wall street journalA visionary and controversial search for water made Los Angeles possible.

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Water to the Angels: William Mulholland, His Monumental Aqueduct, and the Rise of Los Angeles

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Ecco #ad - At a time when the importance of water is being recognized as never before—considered by many experts to be the essential resource of the twenty-first century—Water to the Angels brings into focus the vigor of a fabled era, the might of a larger than life individual, and the scale of a priceless construction project, and sheds critical light on a past that offers insights for our future.

Water to the Angels includes 8 pages of photographs. Drawing on new research, les standiford vividly captures the larger-then-life engineer and the breathtaking scope of his six-year, a state, $23 million project that would transform a region, and a nation at the dawn of its greatest century. With energy and colorful detail, deception, Water to the Angels brings to life the personalities, politics, and power—including bribery, force, and bicoastal financial warfare—behind this dramatic event.

Water to the Angels: William Mulholland, His Monumental Aqueduct, and the Rise of Los Angeles #ad - The author of last train to paradise tells the story of the largest public water project ever created—William Mulholland’s Los Angeles aqueduct—a story of Gilded Age ambition, hubris, greed, and one determined man who's vision shaped the future and continues to impact us today. In 1907, irish immigrant william mulholland conceived and built one of the greatest civil engineering feats in history: the aqueduct that carried water 223 miles from the Sierra Nevada mountains to Los Angeles—allowing this small, resource-challenged desert city to grow into a modern global metropolis.

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St. Francis Dam Disaster Images of America Arcadia Publishing

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Arcadia Publishing #ad - The damís 200-foot concrete wall crumpled, sweeping 54 miles down the Santa Clara River to the sea, sending billions of gallons of raging flood waters down San Francisquito Canyon, and claiming over 450 lives in the disaster. The event was one of the worst disasters in Californiaís history, second only to the San Francisco Earthquake and Fire.

Francis Dam collapsed. Beginning at dawn on the morning after the disaster, stunned local residents picked up their cameras to record the path of destruction, destroyed homes and buildings, and professional photographers moved in to take images of the washed-out bridges, Red Cross workers giving aid, and the massive clean-up that followed.

St. Francis Dam Disaster Images of America Arcadia Publishing #ad - Francis dam on its first filling was the greatest American civil engineering failure of the 20th century. Captured here in over 200 images is a photographic record of the devastation caused by the flood, and the heroic efforts of residents and rescue workers. Minutes before midnight on the evening of March 12, 1928, the St.

Built by the city of los angelesí Bureau of Water Works and Supply, the failure of the St.

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William Mulholland and the Rise of Los Angeles

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University of California Press #ad - The story of los angeles's quest for water is both famous and notorious: it has been the subject of the classic yet historically distorted movie Chinatown, as well as many other accounts. William mulholland presided over the creation of a water system that forever changed the course of southern California's history.

Mulholland, a self-taught engineer, was the chief architect of the Owens Valley Aqueduct—a project ranking in magnitude and daring with the Panama Canal—that brought water to semi-arid Los Angeles from the lush Owens Valley. She scrutinizes mulholland's life—from his childhood in Ireland to his triumphant completion of the Owens Valley Aqueduct to the tragedy that ended his career.

Catherine mulholland, and adds to our historical understanding with extensive primary research in sources such as Mulholland's recently uncovered office files, newspapers, provides insights into this story that family familiarity affords, the engineer's granddaughter, and Department of Water and Power archives.

William Mulholland and the Rise of Los Angeles #ad - Los angeles times best Nonfiction Book of 2000 This first full-length biography of mulholland challenges many of the prevailing versions of his life story and sheds new light on the history of Los Angeles and its relationship with its most prized resource: water. This vivid portrait of a rich chapter in the history of Los Angeles is enhanced with a generous selection of previously unpublished photographs.

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Thirsty: William Mulholland, California Water, and the Real Chinatown

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Rare Bird Books, A Vireo Book #ad - Thirsty is an exploration of Los Angeles' storied history in regards to water. Starting with william Mullholland and his aqueducts, through the 1926 collapse of the St. Francis dam, which killed hundreds, and on through to the profound implications Los Angeles' path has for today. Where marc reiser's seminal 1986 book Cadillac Desert started, Marc Weingarten's Thirsty continues.

Thirsty: William Mulholland, California Water, and the Real Chinatown #ad - Illuminating the complexities of the los angeles aquaduct system, the politics behind supplying America's second largest city with water from hundreds of mile away, and the disaster that haunted William Mullholland until his final days.

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Eruption: The Untold Story of Mount St. Helens

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W. W. Norton & Company #ad - Helens eruption that will "long stand as a classic of descriptive narrative" Simon Winchester. For months in early 1980, journalists, scientists, and nearby residents listened anxiously to rumblings from Mount St. Steve olson interweaves vivid personal stories with the history, science, and economic forces that influenced the fates and futures of those around the volcano.

Still, no one was prepared when a cataclysmic eruption blew the top off of the mountain, laying waste to hundreds of square miles of land and killing fifty-seven people. Eruption delivers a spellbinding narrative of an event that changed the course of volcanic science, and an epic tale of our fraught relationship with the natural world.

Eruption: The Untold Story of Mount St. Helens #ad - A riveting history of the Mount St. Helens in southwestern Washington State.

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Fire in the Grove: The Cocoanut Grove Tragedy and Its Aftermath

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Da Capo Press #ad - In retelling the horrific events of one of America's most cataclysmic tragedies, Esposito has fashioned both an incomparably gripping narrative and a vibrant portrait of the era. The grove was a classic firetrap, the product of greed and indifference on the part of the owners and the politicians who had knowingly allowed such conditions to exist.

Esposito reminds us that the cautionary tale of the Cocoanut Grove is still relevant today. New york Law Journal. But it is the intense, detailed narrative of the fire--harrowing yet compulsively readable--and the trials that followed that will stay with the reader well after they finish this remarkable book.

Fire in the Grove: The Cocoanut Grove Tragedy and Its Aftermath #ad - Against the backdrop of Boston politics, and corruption, cronyism, author John C. Esposito re-creates the drama of the fire and explores the public outcry that followed. On saturday night, 1942, November 28, Boston suffered its worst disaster ever. History took the lives of 492 people--nearly one of every two people on the premises.

A flash of fire that started in an imitation palm tree rolled through the overcrowded club with breathtaking speed and in a mere eight minutes anyone left in the club was dead or doomed. At the city's premier nightspot, the Cocoanut Grove, the largest nightclub fire in U. S.

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Gone at 3:17: The Untold Story of the Worst School Disaster in American History

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Potomac Books Inc. #ad - At 3:17 p. M. The odorless, colorless gas went undetected until the flip of an electrical switch triggered a colossal blast. More than 300 students and teachers were killed, and hundreds more were injured. On march 18, a natural gas leak beneath the london junior-Senior High School in the oil boomtown of New London, 1937, Texas, created a lethal mixture of gas and oxygen in the school’s basement.

Few, its victims, know of this historic tragedy, its cause, however, until now, has chronicled the explosion, and no book, and the aftermath. Gone at 3:17 is a true story of what can happen when school officials make bad decisions. To save money on heating the school building, the trustees had authorized workers to tap into a pipeline carrying “waste” natural gas produced by a gasoline refinery.

Gone at 3:17: The Untold Story of the Worst School Disaster in American History #ad - Many of those interviewed during twenty years of research are no longer living, but their acts of heroism and stories of survival live on in this meticulously documented and extensively illustrated book. History. As the seventy-fifth anniversary of the catastrophe approaches, it remains the deadliest school disaster in U.

S. The knowledge that the tragedy could have been prevented added immeasurably to the heartbreak experienced by the survivors and the victims’ families. The explosion led to laws that now require gas companies to add the familiar pungent odor.

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The White Cascade: The Great Northern Railway Disaster and America's Deadliest Avalanche

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Henry Holt and Co. #ad - Finally, the unthinkable occurred: the earth shifted and a colossal avalanche tumbled from the high pinnacles, just when escape seemed possible, sweeping the trains and their sleeping passengers over the steep slope and down the mountainside. But the storm was unrelenting, and to the passenger's great anxiety, the railcars--their only shelter--were parked precariously on the edge of a steep ravine.

History in which two trains full of people, are hit by a devastating avalanche In February 1910, a monstrous blizzard centered on Washington State hit the Northwest, trapped high in the Cascade Mountains, breaking records. The world stopped--but nowhere was the danger more terrifying than near a tiny town called Wellington, hungry passengers and their crews found themselves marooned without escape, where a desperate situation evolved minute by minute: two trainloads of cold, perched high in the Cascade Mountains, their railcars gradually being buried in the rising drifts.

The White Cascade: The Great Northern Railway Disaster and America's Deadliest Avalanche #ad - . As the days passed, food and coal supplies dwindled. The never-before-told story of one of the worst rail disasters in U. S. An adventure saga filled with colorful and engaging history, this is epic narrative storytelling at its finest. Centered on the astonishing spectacle of our nation's deadliest avalanche, The White Cascade is the masterfully told story of a supremely dramatic and never-before-documented American tragedy.

For days, an army of the great northern railroad's most dedicated men--led by the line's legendarily courageous superintendent, James O'Neill--worked round-the-clock to rescue the trains.

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Colossus: Hoover Dam and the Making of the American Century

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Free Press #ad - Its construction was a gargantuan engineering feat achieved at great human cost, its progress marred by the abuse of a desperate labor force. Yet the story of Hoover Dam has a darker side. In hiltzik’s hands, who gave the dam his name though he initially opposed its construction; frank crowe, the dam’s renowned master builder, Southern California’s great builder of water works, who urged the dam upon a reluctant Congress; Herbert Hoover, the players in this epic historical tale spring vividly to life: President Theodore Roosevelt, who conceived the project; William Mulholland, who pushed his men mercilessly to raise the beautiful concrete rampart in an inhospitable desert gorge.

Hiltzik combines exhaustive research, trenchant observation, and unforgettable storytelling to shed new light on a major turning point of twentieth-century history. The water and power it made available spurred the development of such great western metropolises as Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Salt Lake City, Denver, and San Diego, Phoenix, but the vision of unlimited growth held dear by its designers and builders is fast turning into a mirage.

In the depths of the great depression it became a symbol of American resilience and ingenuity in the face of crisis, putting thousands of men to work in a remote desert canyon and bringing unruly nature to heel. Pulitzer prize–winning writer michael hiltzik uses the saga of the dam’s conception, design, economic, and construction to tell the broader story of America’s efforts to come to grips with titanic social, and natural forces.

Colossus: Hoover Dam and the Making of the American Century #ad - As breathtaking today as the day it was completed, Hoover Dam not only shaped the American West but helped launch the American century. Finally there is franklin Roosevelt, who presided over the ultimate completion of the project and claimed the credit for it. For embodied in the dam’s striking machine-age form is the fundamental transformation the Depression wrought in the nation’s very culture—the shift from the concept of rugged individualism rooted in the frontier days of the nineteenth century to the principle of shared enterprise and communal support that would build the America we know today.

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Tinder Box: The Iroquois Theatre Disaster 1903

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Chicago Review Press #ad - Instead it became the funeral pyre for hundreds of victims. Some exists, were hidden behind heavy draperies, for aesthetic reasons, doors opened inward and exterior fire escapes were unfinished. More than 600 people died. Because of the magnitude of the catastrophe and the obvious corruption that allowed it to happen, building and fire laws were changed to prevent it everhappening again.

Tony hatch, former cbs reporter and emmy award winner, riveting detail, based on more than forty years of research, tells the grisly story in meticulous, including many exclusive interviews with eyewitnesses. This the 100th anniversary of one of worst man-made disasters of the 20th century. In a rush to open the theatre on time, and the Iroquois lacked the most basic fire-fighting equipment: sprinklers, backstage telephone, corners were cut, fire alarm boxes, exit signs and functioning asbestos curtain.

Tinder Box: The Iroquois Theatre Disaster 1903 #ad - When the iroquois theatre opened in chicago on november 23, a monument to modern design and technology, 1903, it was considered one of the grandest structures of its day, as well as "absolutely fireproof. This was a theatre that would rival any in New York or Paris. In tinder box, he tells the Iroquois story as it has never been told before.

A short circuit in a single backstage spotlight touched off a small fire that, in minutes, erupted into an uncontrollable blaze. Tinder box is a riveting history of a traumatic and costly calamity.

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