Infinite Suburbia: 52 illustrated essays on the future of suburban development from the perspectives of architecture, planning, history, and transportation

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Princeton Architectural Press #ad - Leventhal center for Advanced Urbanism's yearlong study of the future of suburban development. This exhaustive compilation is richly illustrated with a wealth of photography, diagrams, and archival materials, aerial drone shots, charts, drawings, maps, plans, making it the definitive statement on suburbia at the beginning of the twenty-first century.

Infinite suburbia is the culmination of the MIT Norman B. Extensive research, energy, history, but not limited to, health, familial trends, social justice, environment, design, mobility, economics, including, architecture, policy, this groundbreaking collection presents fifty-two essays by seventy-four authors from twenty different fields, planning, demographics, and a conference at MIT's Media Lab, landscape, an exhibition, and applied and future technologies.

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Four Walls and a Roof: The Complex Nature of a Simple Profession

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Harvard University Press #ad - Together, architects, developers, politicians, and consultants form an improvised world of contest and compromise that none alone can control. To achieve anything, architects must serve the powers they strive to critique, finding themselves in a perpetual conflict of interest. Four walls and a roof challenges this notion, presenting a candid account of what it is really like to work as an architect.

Drawing on his own tragicomic experiences in the field, moscow, reinier de Graaf reveals the world of contemporary architecture in vivid snapshots: from suburban New York to the rubble of northern Iraq, from the corridors of wealth in London, and Dubai to garbage-strewn wastelands that represent the demolished hopes of postwar social housing.

Four Walls and a Roof: The Complex Nature of a Simple Profession #ad - . Architecture, we like to believe, is an elevated art form that shapes the world as it pleases. We meet oligarchs determined to translate ambitions into concrete and steel, bureaucrats, consultants, developers for whom architecture is mere investment, and the layers of politicians, and mysterious hangers-on who lie between any architectural idea and the chance of its execution.

Four walls and a roof tells the story of a profession buffeted by external forces that determine―at least as much as individual inspiration―what architects design. Perhaps the most important myth debunked is success itself.

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Radical Suburbs: Experimental Living on the Fringes of the American City

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Belt Publishing #ad - The history of suburbia is equally surprising: American suburbs were once fertile ground for utopian planning, socially-conscious design, communal living, and integrated housing. Inside radical suburbs you will find blueprints for affordable, walkable, and integrated communities, filled with a range of environmentally sound residential options.

America’s suburbs are not the homogenous places we sometimes take them for. The cliche of white picket fences is well past its expiration date. Radical suburbs is a history that will help us remake the future and rethink our assumptions of suburbia. Today’s suburbs are racially, ethnically, with as many Democratic as Republican voters, and economically diverse, a growing population of renters, and rising poverty.

Radical Suburbs: Experimental Living on the Fringes of the American City #ad - We have forgotten that we built suburbs like these, pennsylvania; a tiny-house anarchist community in Piscataway, such as the co-housing commune of Old Economy, architecturally daring Reston, Massachusetts; and the mixed-use, New Jersey; a government-planned garden city in Greenbelt, Pennsylvania; experimental Modernist enclaves in Lexington, Maryland; a racially integrated subdivision before the Fair Housing Act in Trevose, Virginia.

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Toward an Urban Ecology: SCAPE / Landscape Architecture

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The Monacelli Press #ad - Monacelli Pr. Kate orff, 2017 macarthur fellow, has an optimistic and transformative message about our world: we can bring together social and ecological systems to sustainably remake our cities and landscapes. Part monograph, part manual, demonstrating how to move beyond familiar and increasingly outmoded ways of thinking about environmental,  Toward an Urban Ecology reconceives urban landscape design as a form of activism, part manife­sto, urban, and social issues as separate domains; and advocating for the synthesis of practice to create a truly urban ecology.

In purely practical terms, policy makers, scape has already generated numerous tools and techniques that designers,  the loss of social cohesion, and communities can use to address some of the most pressing issues of our time, including the loss of biodiversity,  and ecological degradation. Toward an urban ecology features numerous projects and select research from SCAPE, and conveys a range of strategies to engender a more resilient and inclusive built environment.

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The Arsenal of Exclusion & Inclusion

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Actar #ad - With contributions from over fifty architects, planners, historians, and journalists, geographers, The Arsenal offers a wide-ranging view of the forces that shape our cities. Who gets to be where? the arsenal of exclusion & inclusion examines some of the policies, real estate brokers, community activists, and physical artifacts that have been used by planners, developers, and other urban actors in the United States to draw, practices, erase, policymakers, or redraw the lines that divide.

Actar. By interboro tobias armborst, Daniel D’Oca, Georgeen Theodore Monacelli Pr. The arsenal inventories these weapons of exclusion and inclusion, describes how they have been used, and speculates about how they might be deployed or retired for the sake of more open cities in which more people have access to more places.

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Landscape as Urbanism: A General Theory

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Princeton University Press #ad - But, landscape has recently emerged as a model and medium for the city, driven in part by environmental concerns, with some theorists arguing that landscape architects are the urbanists of our age. Actar. In the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, as urban planning shifted from design to social science, and as urban design committed to neotraditional models of town planning, landscape urbanism emerged to fill a void at the heart of the contemporary urban project.

Generously illustrated, andrea branzi, adriaan geuze, Landscape as Urbanism examines works from around the world by designers ranging from Ludwig Hilberseimer, and Frank Lloyd Wright to James Corner, and Michael Van Valkenburgh. Princeton University Press. Growing out of progressive architectural culture and populist environmentalism, the concept was further informed by the nineteenth-century invention of landscape architecture as a "new art" charged with reconciling the design of the industrial city with its ecological and social conditions.

Landscape as Urbanism: A General Theory #ad - In landscape as urbanism, one of the field's pioneers presents a powerful case for rethinking the city through landscape. Charles waldheim traces the roots of landscape as a form of urbanism from its origins in the Renaissance through the twentieth century. The result is the definitive account of an emerging field that is likely to influence the design of cities for decades to come.

Monacelli Pr.

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The Human City: Urbanism for the Rest of Us

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Agate B2 #ad - Actar. Princeton University Press. Enriching our understanding of what cities are about and what they can and must become. Wall street journal around the globe, small units, most new urban development has adhered to similar tenets: tall structures, and high density. In the human city, joel kotkin―called “america’s uber-geographer” by David Brooks of the New York Times―questions these nearly ubiquitous practices, suggesting that they do not consider the needs and desires of the vast majority of people.

The human city presents the most cogent, evidence-based and clear-headed exposition of the pro-suburban argument. Built environments, kotkin argues, must reflect the preferences of most people―even if that means lower-density development. Agate B2. Monacelli Pr. This book is not anti-urban, but it does advocate a greater range of options for people to live the way they want at all stages of their lives.

The Human City: Urbanism for the Rest of Us #ad - Armed with his own astute research, and a sound grasp of economic, and social trends, political, a deep-seated knowledge of urban history, Kotkin pokes holes in what he calls the “retro-urbanist” ideology and offers a refreshing case for dispersion centered on human values. The human city ponders the purpose of the city and investigates the factors that drive most urban development today.

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Shaping Cities in an Urban Age

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Phaidon Press #ad - Princeton University Press. Agate B2. Actar. Monacelli Pr. An authoritative - and fascinating - investigation into the spatial and social dynamics of cities at a global scaleShaping Cities in an Urban Age is the third addition to Phaidon's hugely successful Urban Age series, published in collaboration with the London School of Economics LSE and the Alfred Herrhausen Gesellschaft AHG.

Shaping Cities in an Urban Age #ad - Generously illustrated with photographs, and featuring a series of essays written by leading people in their fields, visual data, and statistics, Shaping Cities in an Urban Age addresses our most urgent contemporary and future urban issues by examining a set of key forces that have combined to create the city as we know it today.

From the publisher of The Endless City and Living in the Endless City.

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The Largest Art: A Measured Manifesto for a Plural Urbanism The MIT Press

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The MIT Press #ad - In the largest art, brent ryan argues that urban design encompasses more than architecture, and he provides a foundational theory of urban design beyond the architectural scale. Why urban design is larger than architecture: the foundational qualities of urban design, but architects imagine it as scaled-up architecture―large, examples and practitionersUrban design in practice is incremental, ready-to-build pop-up cities.

Actar. Cities are ceaselessly active, perpetually changing. In a “declaration of independence” for urban design, Ryan describes urban design as the largest of the building arts, with qualities of its own. Ryan distinguishes urban design from its sister arts by its pluralism: plural scale, ranging from an alleyway to a region; plural time, with many owners; plural agents, with many makers; and plural form, because it is deeply enmeshed in both history and the present; plural property, with a distributed quality that allows it to coexist with diverse elements of the city.

The Largest Art: A Measured Manifesto for a Plural Urbanism The MIT Press #ad - Ryan looks at three well-known urban design projects through the lens of pluralism: a Brancusi sculptural ensemble in Romania, and a formally and spatially diverse grouping of projects in Ljubljana, a Bronx housing project, Slovenia. Princeton University Press. And he tells three design stories for the future, imaginary scenarios of plural urbanism in locations around the world.

Ryan concludes his manifesto with three signal considerations urban designers must acknowledge: eternal change, inevitable incompletion, and flexible fidelity. He revisits the thought of three plural urbanists working between 1960 and 1980: David Crane, Edmund Bacon, and Kevin Lynch.

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The Man in the Glass House: Philip Johnson, Architect of the Modern Century

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Little, Brown and Company #ad - Actar. Agate B2. But johnson was also a man of deep paradoxes: he was a Nazi sympathizer, an enfant terrible into his old age, a designer of synagogues, a populist, and a snob. The first recipient of the pritzker prize and moma's founding architectural curator, johnson made his mark as one of America's leading architects with his famous Glass House in New Caanan, and his controversial AT&T Building in NYC, CT, among many others in nearly every city in the country--but his most natural role was as a consummate power broker and shaper of public opinion.

Johnson introduced european modernism--the sleek, and mentored generations of architects, glass-and-steel architecture that now dominates our cities--to America, designers, and artists to follow. He defined the era of "starchitecture" with its flamboyant buildings and celebrity designers who esteemed aesthetics and style above all other concerns.

The Man in the Glass House: Philip Johnson, Architect of the Modern Century #ad - His clients ranged from the Rockefellers to televangelists to Donald Trump. Award-winning architectural critic and biographer Mark Lamster's The Man in the Glass House lifts the veil on Johnson's controversial and endlessly contradictory life to tell the story of a charming yet deeply flawed man. Princeton University Press.

A "smoothly written and fair-minded" wall street journal biography of architect Philip Johnson--a finalist for the National Book Critic's Circle Award When Philip Johnson died in 2005 at the age of 98, he was still one of the most recognizable--and influential--figures on the American cultural landscape.

A rollercoaster tale of the perils of wealth, and ambition, privilege, this book probes the dynamics of American culture that made him so powerful, and tells the story of the built environment in modern America.

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The New Localism: How Cities Can Thrive in the Age of Populism

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Brookings Institution Press #ad - Princeton University Press. Indianapolis is governing its city and metropolis through a network of public, private and civic leaders. Pittsburgh is catalyzing inclusive growth by inventing and deploying new industries and technologies. The new localism provides a roadmap for change that starts in the communities where most people live and work.

In their new book, the new localism, economic, urban experts Bruce Katz and Jeremy Nowak reveal where the real power to create change lies and how it can be used to address our most serious social, and environmental challenges. Power is shifting in the world: downward from national governments and states to cities and metropolitan communities; horizontally from the public sector to networks of public, private and civic actors; and globally along circuits of capital, trade, and innovation.

The New Localism: How Cities Can Thrive in the Age of Populism #ad - This new locus of power―this new localism―is emerging by necessity to solve the grand challenges characteristic of modern societies: economic competitiveness, social inclusion and opportunity; a renewed public life; the challenge of diversity; and the imperative of environmental sustainability. Actar.

Copenhagen is using publicly owned assets like their waterfront to spur large scale redevelopment and finance infrastructure from land sales. Out of these stories emerge new norms of growth, sustainable, and finance and a path toward a more prosperous, governance, and inclusive society. Katz and nowak imagine a world in which urban institutions finance the future through smart investments in innovation, infrastructure and children and urban intermediaries take solutions created in one city and adapt and tailor them to other cities with speed and precision.

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