The Enigma of Reason

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Harvard University Press #ad - Reason, they argue, convince others, helps us justify our beliefs, and evaluate arguments. It is extremely well written, interesting, and very enjoyable to read. Gilbert harman, Princeton University. It makes it easier to cooperate and communicate and to live together in groups. Brilliant…Timely and necessary.

Financial times“especially timely as we struggle to make sense of how it is that individuals and communities persist in holding beliefs that have been thoroughly discredited. Darren frey, science if reason is what makes us human, why do we behave so irrationally? And if it is so useful, why didn’t it evolve in other animals? This groundbreaking account of the evolution of reason by two renowned cognitive scientists seeks to solve this double enigma.

The Enigma of Reason #ad - Provocative, entertaining, and undeniably relevant, The Enigma of Reason will make many reasonable people rethink their beliefs. Reasonable-seeming people are often totally irrational. Rarely has this insight seemed more relevant…still, an essential puzzle remains: How did we come to be this way?…Cognitive scientists Hugo Mercier and Dan Sperber argue that reason developed not to enable us to solve abstract, logical problems…but to resolve the problems posed by living in collaborative groups.

Elizabeth kolbert, new yorker “turns reason’s weaknesses into strengths, arguing that its supposed flaws are actually design features that work remarkably well. Financial times“The best thing I have read about human reasoning.

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The Knowledge Illusion: Why We Never Think Alone

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Riverhead Books #ad - And yet each of us is error prone, sometimes irrational, and often ignorant. The human mind is both brilliant and pathetic. The knowledge illusion contends that true genius can be found in the ways we create intelligence using the community around us. Humans have built hugely complex societies and technologies, but most of us don’t even know how a pen or a toilet works.

The fundamentally communal nature of intelligence and knowledge explains why we often assume we know more than we really do, why political opinions and false beliefs are so hard to change, and why individual-oriented approaches to education and management frequently fail. The knowledge illusion is filled with insights on how we should deal with our individual ignorance and collective wisdom.

The Knowledge Illusion: Why We Never Think Alone #ad - Steven pinkerWe all think we know more than we actually do. We have mastered fire, created democratic institutions, stood on the moon, and sequenced our genome. The key to our intelligence lies in the people and things around us. But our collaborative minds also enable us to do amazing things. How have we achieved so much despite understanding so little? Cognitive scientists Steven Sloman and Philip Fernbach argue that we survive and thrive despite our mental shortcomings because we live in a rich community of knowledge.

. We’re constantly drawing on information and expertise stored outside our heads: in our bodies, our possessions, our environment, and the community with which we interact—and usually we don’t even realize we’re doing it.

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Denying to the Grave: Why We Ignore the Facts That Will Save Us

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Oxford University Press #ad - In denying to the grave, gorman and Gorman, a father-daughter team, explore the psychology of health science denial. This psychological difficulty of incorporating new information is on the cutting edge of neuroscience research, as scientists continue to identify brain responses to new information that reveal deep-seated, innate discomfort with changing our minds.

Denying to the grave explores risk theory and how people make decisions about what is best for them and their loved ones, in an effort to better understand how people think when faced with significant health decisions. Using several examples of such denial as test cases, they propose six key principles that may lead individuals to reject "accepted" health-related wisdom: the charismatic leader; fear of complexity; confirmation bias and the internet; fear of corporate and government conspiracies; causality and filling the ignorance gap; and the nature of risk prediction.

Denying to the Grave: Why We Ignore the Facts That Will Save Us #ad - The authors argue that the health sciences are especially vulnerable to our innate resistance to integrate new concepts with pre-existing beliefs. Oxford university Press USA. This book points the way to a new and important understanding of how science should be conveyed to the public in order to save lives with existing knowledge and technology.

. Why do some parents refuse to vaccinate their children? why do some people keep guns at home, despite scientific evidence of risk to their family members? And why do people use antibiotics for illnesses they cannot possibly alleviate? When it comes to health, that the evidence is incomplete, many people insist that science is wrong, and that unidentified hazards lurk everywhere.

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The Great Mental Models: General Thinking Concepts

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Latticework Publishing Inc. #ad - Oxford university Press USA. The old saying goes, ''To the man with a hammer, everything looks like a nail. But anyone who has done any kind of project knows a hammer often isn't enough. Until now. The same is true when it comes to your thinking. Upgrade your mental toolbox and get the first volume today. You will discover what forces govern the universe and how to focus your efforts so you can harness them to your advantage, rather than fight with them or worse yet-- ignore them.

. And most people are going through life with little more than a hammer. The great mental models: general thinking concepts is the first book in The Great Mental Models series designed to upgrade your thinking with the best, most useful and powerful tools so you always have the right one on hand. This volume details nine of the most versatile, all-purpose mental models you can use right away to improve your decision making, productivity, and how clearly you see the world.

The Great Mental Models: General Thinking Concepts #ad - The quality of your outcomes depends on the mental models in your head. The more tools you have at your disposal, the more likely you'll use the right tool for the job -- and get it done right.

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Worlds Hidden in Plain Sight: Thirty Years of Complexity Thinking at the Santa Fe Institute

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Santa Fe Institute Press #ad - Over the last three decades, the Santa Fe Institute and its network of researchers have been pursuing a revolution in science. Ignoring the boundaries of disciplines and schools and searching for novel fundamental ideas, theories, and practices, this international community integrates the full range of scientific inquiries that will help us to understand and survive on a complex planet.

This volume collects essays from the past thirty years of research, in which contributors explain in clear and accessible language many of the deepest challenges and insights of complexity science. Explore the evolution of complex systems science with chapters from Nobel Laureates Murray Gell-Mann and Kenneth Arrow, aswell as numerous pioneering complexity researchers, Robert May, Jennifer Dunne, Richard Lewontin, including John Holland, Brian Arthur, and Geoffrey West.

Worlds Hidden in Plain Sight: Thirty Years of Complexity Thinking at the Santa Fe Institute #ad - Oxford university Press USA.

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Irrationality: A History of the Dark Side of Reason

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Princeton University Press #ad - A fascinating history that reveals the ways in which the pursuit of rationality often leads to an explosion of irrationalityIt’s a story we can’t stop telling ourselves. The problem is that the rational gives birth to the irrational and vice versa in an endless cycle, and any effort to permanently set things in order sooner or later ends in an explosion of unreason.

From sex and music to religion and war, irrationality makes up the greater part of human life and history. Rich and ambitious, politics, Irrationality ranges across philosophy, and current events. Later, the Enlightenment enshrined rationality as the supreme value. For better or worse, it is an ineradicable feature of life.

Irrationality: A History of the Dark Side of Reason #ad - Illuminating unreason at a moment when the world appears to have gone mad again, provocative, Irrationality is fascinating, and timely. Discovering that reason is the defining feature of our species, we named ourselves the “rational animal. But is this flattering story itself rational? in this sweeping account of irrationality from antiquity to today―from the fifth-century BC murder of Hippasus for revealing the existence of irrational numbers to the rise of Twitter mobs and the election of Donald Trump―Justin Smith says the evidence suggests the opposite.

Because of this, it is irrational to try to eliminate irrationality. Oxford university Press USA.

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The Meritocracy Trap: How America's Foundational Myth Feeds Inequality, Dismantles the Middle Class, and Devours the Elite

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Penguin Press #ad - Oxford university Press USA. When the meritocracy trap reveals the inner workings of the meritocratic machine, it also illuminates the first steps outward, towards a new world that might once again afford dignity and prosperity to the American people. Markovits is well placed to expose the sham of meritocracy.

It sustains the American dream. Markovits also knows that, if we understand that meritocratic inequality produces near-universal harm, we can cure it. But what if, both up and down the social ladder, meritocracy is a sham? Today, meritocracy has become exactly what it was conceived to resist: a mechanism for the concentration and dynastic transmission of wealth and privilege across generations.

The Meritocracy Trap: How America's Foundational Myth Feeds Inequality, Dismantles the Middle Class, and Devours the Elite #ad - Upward mobility has become a fantasy, and the embattled middle classes are now more likely to sink into the working poor than to rise into the professional elite. At the same time, requiring rich adults to work with crushing intensity, meritocracy now ensnares even those who manage to claw their way to the top, exploiting their expensive educations in order to extract a return.

Meritocracy cuts to the heart of who we are. This is the radical argument that Daniel Markovits prosecutes with rare force. A revolutionary new argument from eminent Yale Law professor Daniel Markovits attacking the false promise of meritocracy It is an axiom of American life that advantage should be earned through ability and effort.

Even as the country divides itself at every turn, the meritocratic ideal – that social and economic rewards should follow achievement rather than breeding – reigns supreme.

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Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst

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Penguin Books #ad - A behavior occurs--whether an example of humans at our best, worst, or somewhere in between. The new york times bestseller“it’s no exaggeration to say that Behave is one of the best nonfiction books I’ve ever read. David P. I loved it. Dina temple-raston, in stages, genre-defining examination of human behavior,  the washington postnamed a best book of the year by the washington post and The Wall Street Journal From the celebrated neurobiologist and primatologist, and then hops back in time from there, and an answer to the question: Why do we do the things we do?Sapolsky's storytelling concept is delightful but it also has a powerful intrinsic logic: he starts by looking at the factors that bear on a person's reaction in the precise moment a behavior occurs, a landmark, both good and bad, ultimately ending up at the deep history of our species and its evolutionary legacy.

Oxford university Press USA. Sapolsky builds on this understanding to wrestle with some of our deepest and thorniest questions relating to tribalism and xenophobia, morality and free will, hierarchy and competition, and war and peace. What went on in a person's brain a second before the behavior happened? then sapolsky pulls out to a slightly larger field of vision, sound, a little earlier in time: What sight, or smell caused the nervous system to produce that behavior? And then, what hormones acted hours to days earlier to change how responsive that individual is to the stimuli that triggered the nervous system? By now he has increased our field of vision so that we are thinking about neurobiology and the sensory world of our environment and endocrinology in trying to explain what happened.

Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst #ad - Sapolsky keeps going: how was that behavior influenced by structural changes in the nervous system over the preceding months, and then back to his or her genetic makeup? Finally, fetal life, by that person's adolescence, childhood, he expands the view to encompass factors larger than one individual. Barash,  the wall street Journal"It has my vote for science book of the year.

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The Knowledge Illusion: Why We Never Think Alone

#ad
Riverhead Books #ad - Humans have built hugely complex societies and technologies, but most of us don’t even know how a pen or a toilet works. The knowledge illusion contends that true genius can be found in the ways we create intelligence using the community around us. The human mind is both brilliant and pathetic. We have mastered fire, created democratic institutions, stood on the moon, and sequenced our genome.

The key to our intelligence lies in the people and things around us. We’re constantly drawing on information and expertise stored outside our heads: in our bodies, our possessions, our environment, and the community with which we interact—and usually we don’t even realize we’re doing it. But our collaborative minds also enable us to do amazing things.

And yet each of us is error prone, sometimes irrational, and often ignorant. Riverhead. How have we achieved so much despite understanding so little? Cognitive scientists Steven Sloman and Philip Fernbach argue that we survive and thrive despite our mental shortcomings because we live in a rich community of knowledge.

The Knowledge Illusion: Why We Never Think Alone #ad - The fundamentally communal nature of intelligence and knowledge explains why we often assume we know more than we really do, why political opinions and false beliefs are so hard to change, and why individual-oriented approaches to education and management frequently fail. The knowledge illusion is filled with insights on how we should deal with our individual ignorance and collective wisdom.

Steven pinkerWe all think we know more than we actually do.

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The Thing Which Has No Name

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WH Allen #ad - Oxford university Press USA. Riverhead.

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Alchemy: The Dark Art and Curious Science of Creating Magic in Brands, Business, and Life

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William Morrow #ad - This means future success can’t be projected on any accounting spreadsheet. Wonderfully applicable to about everything in life. Nassim nicholas taleb, author of The Black Swan“Veins of wisdom emerge regularly and brilliantly from these pages. To strike gold, you must master the dark art and curious science of conjuring irresistible ideas: alchemy.

Based on thirty years of field work inside the largest experiment in human behavior ever conceived—the forever-unfolding pageant of consumer capitalism—Alchemy, blending leading-edge scientific research, decodes human behavior, and practical case studies from his storied career working on campaigns for AmEx, whose TED talks have been viewed nearly seven million times, Microsoft, absurdly entertaining storytelling, deep psychological insight, the revolutionary book by Ogilvy advertising legend Rory Sutherland, and others.

Alchemy: The Dark Art and Curious Science of Creating Magic in Brands, Business, and Life #ad - Heralded as “one of the leading minds in the world of branding” by npr and "the don of modern advertising" by The Times, Sutherland is a unique thought leader, as comfortable exchanging ideas with Nobel Prize winners Daniel Kahneman and Richard Thaler both interviewed in these pages as he is crafting the next product launch.

Equally startling and profound, Sutherland’s journey through the strange world of decision making is filled with astonishing lessons for all aspects of life and business. Oxford university Press USA. The surrounding world, meanwhile, is irreducibly complex and random. Riverhead. His unconventional and relentlessly curious approach has led him to discover that the most compelling secrets to human decision-making can be found in surprising places:What can honey bees teach us about creating a sustainable business?How could budget airlines show us how to market a healthcare system?Why is it better to be vaguely right than precisely wrong?What might soccer penalty kicks teach us about the dangers of risk-aversion?Better “branding, ” Sutherland reveals, but to promote a variety of social aims, improving public health outcomes, can also be employed not just to sell products, like getting people to pay taxes, or encouraging more women to pursue careers in tech.

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