The Yellow-Lighted Bookshop: A Memoir, a History

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Graywolf Press #ad - I cannot remember when I read a book with such delight. Paul yamazaki, city lights BookstoreNovember, a dark, rainy Tuesday, late afternoon. I've come to find a book. In the yellow-lighted bookshop, getting lost in the deep canyons of shelves, Buzbee, celebrates the unique experience of the bookstore—the smell and touch of books, a former bookseller and sales representative, and the silent community of readers.

He shares his passion for books, which began with ordering through The Weekly Reader in grade school. This is my ideal time to be in a bookstore. Interwoven throughout is afascinating historical account of the bookseller's trade—from the great Alexandria library with an estimated one million papyrus scrolls to Sylvia Beach's famous Paris bookstore, Shakespeare and Company, which led to the extraordinary effort to publish and sell James Joyce's Ulysses during the 1920s.

The Yellow-Lighted Bookshop: A Memoir, a History #ad - Rich with anecdotes, the yellow-Lighted Bookshop is the perfect choice for those who relish the enduring pleasures of spending an afternoon finding just the right book. The shortened light of the afternoon and the idleness and hush of the hour gather everything close, the shelves and the books and the few other customers who graze head-bent in the narrow aisles.

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Time Was Soft There: A Paris Sojourn at Shakespeare & Co.

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St. Martin's Press #ad - Time was soft there is a charming memoir about living in Whitman's Shakespeare & Co. Has become a destination for writers and readers the world over, trying to reclaim the lost world of literary Paris in the 1920s. Spend a few days with jeremy mercer at 37 Rue de la Bucherie, and discover the bohemian world of Paris that still bustles in the shadow of Notre Dame.

Jeremy mercer has captured Shakespeare & Co. And its complicated owner, George Whitman, with remarkable insight. Some bookstores are filled with stories both inside and outside the bindings. As time was soft there winds in and around the streets of paris, the staff fall in and out of love, host tea parties, sell a few books, drink in the more down-at-the-heels cafés, straighten bookshelves, and help George find a way to keep his endangered bookstore open.

Time was soft there is one of the great stories of bohemian Paris and recalls the work of many writers who were bewitched by the City of Light in their youth. Jeremy's comrades include simon, who flirts with beautiful women looking for copies of Tropic of Cancer, beautiful blonde Pia, who contributes the elegant spirit of Parisian couture to the store, and George himself, the eccentric British poet who refuses to give up his bed in the antiquarian book room, the handsome American Kurt, the man who holds the key to it all.

Time Was Soft There: A Paris Sojourn at Shakespeare & Co. #ad - These are places of sanctuary, even redemption-and Jeremy Mercer has found both amid the stacks of Shakespeare & Co. Paul collins, author of sixpence house: lost in a Town of BooksIn a small square on the left bank of the Seine, the door to a green-fronted bookshop beckoned. Having been inspired by sylvia beach's original store, George Whitman, the present owner, invites writers who are down and out in Paris to live and dream amid the bookshelves in return for work.

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The Bookshop Book

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Constable #ad - The bookshop book is a love letter to bookshops all around the world. From the oldest bookshop in the world, talks to authors about their favourite places, The Bookshop Book examines the history of books, and looks at over three hundred weirdly wonderful bookshops across six continents sadly, to the smallest you could imagine, we've yet to build a bookshop down in the South Pole.

Bookshops on boats, on buses, and in old run-down train stations. A good bookshop is not just about selling books from shelves, but reaching out into the world and making a difference. David almond the bookshop book includes interviews and quotes from David Almond, Jeanette Winterson and many, Ian Rankin, Jacqueline Wilson, Audrey Niffenegger, Tracy Chevalier, many others.

The Bookshop Book #ad - . We're not talking about rooms that are just full of books. Meet sarah and her book barge sailing across the sea to France; meet Sebastien, in Mongolia, who sells books to herders of the Altai mountains; meet the bookshop in Canada that's invented the world's first antiquarian book vending machine. And that's just the beginning.

Fold-out bookshops, undercover bookshops, this-is-the-best-place-I've-ever-been-to-bookshops. We're talking about bookshops in barns, disused factories, converted churches and underground car parks.

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Reluctant Capitalists: Bookselling and the Culture of Consumption

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University of Chicago Press #ad - She reveals why customers have such fierce loyalty to certain bookstores and why they identify so strongly with different types of books. What drives that debate? and why do so many people believe that bookselling should be immune to questions of profit?In Reluctant Capitalists, Miller looks at a century of book retailing, demonstrating that the independent/chain dynamic is not entirely new.

Over the past half-century, like many retail industries, bookselling, has evolved from an arena dominated by independent bookstores to one in which chain stores have significant market share. The advent of the Internet has further spurred tremendous changes in how booksellers approach their business. In the process, underscoring her point that any type of consumer behavior is inevitably political, she also teases out the meanings of retailing and consumption in American culture at large, with consequences for communities as well as commercial institutions.

Reluctant Capitalists: Bookselling and the Culture of Consumption #ad - And as in other areas of retail, this transformation has often been a less-than-smooth process. Miller, because more than most other consumer goods, books are the focus of passionate debate. It began one hundred years ago when department stores began selling books, continued through the 1960s with the emergence of national chain stores, and exploded with the formation of “superstores” in the 1990s.

All of these changes have met resistance from book professionals and readers who believe that the book business should somehow be “above” market forces and instead embrace more noble priorities. Miller uses interviews with bookstore customers and members of the book industry to explain why books evoke such distinct and heated reactions.

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Rebel Bookseller: Why Indie Bookstores Represent Everything You Want to Fight for from Free Speech to Buying Local to Building Communities

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Seven Stories Press #ad - He alternates his narrative with short anecdotes, interludes between the chapters that give his credo as a bookseller. His innovations were adapted by Barnes & Noble, Zany Brainy, and scores of independent stores. The revival of independent bookselling has already begun and is one of the amazing stories of our times.

Rebel bookseller is a must read for those in the book biz, a testament to the ingeniousness of one man man’s story of making a life out of his passionate commitment to books and bookselling. Along the way, he explains the growth of the chains, and throws in a treasure trove of tips for anyone who is considering opening up a bookstore.

Rebel Bookseller: Why Indie Bookstores Represent Everything You Want to Fight for from Free Speech to Buying Local to Building Communities #ad - In rebel bookseller, laties tells how he got started, how he kept going, and why he believes independent bookselling has a great future. Bookseller andy laties wrote the first edition of Rebel Bookseller six years ago, hoping it would spark a movement. From the mid-1980s to the present, starting out in chicago, and finally running the bookshop at the Eric Carle Museum in Amherst, teaching along the way at the American Booksellers Association, Andy Laties has been an independent bookseller, Massachusetts.

. Now, and how even in the face of electronic readers from three of america’s largest and most successful companies—Apple, Laties’s book can be a rallying cry for everyone who wants to better understand how the rise of the big bookstore chains led irrevocably to their decline, with this second edition, Amazon, especially bookstores, and Google—the movement to support locally owned independent stores, is on the rise.

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An Autobiography

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William Morrow Paperbacks #ad - The autobiography of the queen of mystery, Agatha Christie.

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The Man Who Loved Books Too Much: The True Story of a Thief, a Detective, and a World of Literary Obsession

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Riverhead Books #ad - Bartlett befriended both outlandish characters and found herself caught in the middle of efforts to recover hidden treasure. John charles Gilkey steals purely for the love of books. In an attempt to understand him better, journalist Allison Hoover Bartlett plunged herself into the world of book lust and discovered just how dangerous it can be.

John gilkey is an obsessed, unrepentant book thief who has stolen hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of rare books from book fairs, stores, and libraries around the country. Immersing the reader in a rich, and theft through the ages, Bartlett looks at the history of book passion, wide world of literary obsession, collection, to examine the craving that makes some people willing to stop at nothing to possess the books they love.

With a mixture of suspense, and humor, insight, she has woven this entertaining cat-and-mouse chase into a narrative that not only reveals exactly how Gilkey pulled off his dirtiest crimes, and how Sanders ultimately caught him but also explores the romance of books, where he stashed the loot, the lure to collect them, and the temptation to steal them.

The Man Who Loved Books Too Much: The True Story of a Thief, a Detective, and a World of Literary Obsession #ad - Ken sanders is the self-appointed "bibliodick" book dealer with a penchant for detective work driven to catch him. In the tradition of the orchid thief, his victims, a compelling narrative set within the strange and genteel world of rare-book collecting: the true story of an infamous book thief, and the man determined to catch him.

Rare-book theft is even more widespread than fine-art theft. Most thieves, of course, steal for profit.

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The Little Bookstore of Big Stone Gap: A Memoir of Friendship, Community, and the Uncommon Pleasure of a Good Book

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St. Martin's Press #ad - Economy, a small town with no industry, and the advent of the e-book. They also had no idea how to run a bookstore. Against all odds, but with optimism, the help of their Virginian mountain community, and an abiding love for books, they succeeded in establishing more than a thriving business - they built a community.

The Little Bookstore of Big Stone Gap: A Memoir of Friendship, Community, and the Uncommon Pleasure of a Good Book #ad - . The only problems? A declining U. S. It is a story about people and books, and how together they create community. An inspiring true story about losing your place, finding your purpose, and building a community one book at a time. Wendy welch and her husband had always dreamed of owning a bookstore, so when they left their high-octane jobs for a simpler life in an Appalachian coal town, they seized an unexpected opportunity to pursue thier dream.

The little bookstore of big stone gap is the little bookstore that could: how two people, two dogs, two cats, and thirty-eight thousand books helped a small town find its heart.

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A Gentle Madness: Bibliophiles, Bibliomanes, and the Eternal Passion for Books

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Fine Books Press #ad - An adventure among the afflicted, A Gentle Madness is vividly anecdotal and thoroughly researched. Written before the emergence of the internet but newly updated for the 21st Century reader, high stakes auctions, A Gentle Madness captures that last moment in time when collectors pursued their passions in dusty bookshops and street stalls, and the subterfuge worthy of a true bibliomaniac.

Now a timeless classic of collecting, no lover of books can miss A Gentle Madness. Nicholas basbanes brings an investigative reporter s heart to illuminate collectors past and present in their pursuit of bibliomania. When first published, a gentle Madness astounded and delighted readers about the passion and expense a collector is willing to make in pursuit of the book.

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