Things to Make and Do in the Fourth Dimension: A Mathematician’s Journey Through Narcissistic Numbers, Optimal Dating Algorithms, at Least Two Kinds of Infinity, and More

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Farrar, Straus and Giroux #ad - In the absorbing and exhilarating things to Make and Do in the Fourth Dimension, Parker sets out to convince his readers to revisit the very math that put them off the subject as fourteen-year-olds. Things to make and do in the fourth Dimension invites us to re-learn much of what we missed in school and, this time, to be utterly enthralled by it.

Starting with the foundations of math familiar from school numbers, and algebra, geometry, he reveals how it is possible to climb all the way up to the topology and to four-dimensional shapes, and from there to infinity—and slightly beyond. A book from the stand-up mathematician that makes math fun again!Math is boring, says the mathematician and comedian Matt Parker.

Things to Make and Do in the Fourth Dimension: A Mathematician's Journey Through Narcissistic Numbers, Optimal Dating Algorithms, at Least Two Kinds of Infinity, and More #ad - Both playful and sophisticated, things to make and do in the Fourth Dimension is filled with captivating games and puzzles, a buffet of optional hands-on activities that entices us to take pleasure in math that is normally only available to those studying at a university level. This counterintuitiveness is actually part of the point, argues Parker: the extraordinary thing about math is that it allows us to access logic and ideas beyond what our brains can instinctively do—through its logical tools we are able to reach beyond our innate abilities and grasp more and more abstract concepts.

Part of the problem may be the way the subject is taught, to a greater or lesser extent, but it's also true that we all, find math difficult and counterintuitive.

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Humble Pi: When Math Goes Wrong in the Real World

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Riverhead Books #ad - Until it doesn’t. All sorts of seemingly innocuous mathematical mistakes can have significant consequences. Exploring and explaining a litany of glitches, big data, street signs, elections, and an Olympic team, Matt Parker uncovers the bizarre ways math trips us up, lotteries, the Roman Empire, near misses, and mathematical mishaps involving the internet, and what this reveals about its essential place in our world.

Humble Pi: When Math Goes Wrong in the Real World #ad - Getting it wrong has never been more fun. Math is easy to ignore until a misplaced decimal point upends the stock market, a unit conversion error causes a plane to crash, or someone divides by zero and stalls a battleship in the middle of the ocean. 1 international bestseller   an adam savage book club pickthe book-length answer to anyone who ever put their hand up in math class and asked, and relentlessly entertaining, “When am I ever going to use this in the real world?” “Fun, informative,  Humble Pi is a charming and very readable guide to some of humanity's all-time greatest miscalculations—that also gives you permission to feel a little better about some of your own mistakes.

Ryan north, author of how to invent everything  Our whole world is built on math, from the code running a website to the equations enabling the design of skyscrapers and bridges. Most of the time this math works quietly behind the scenes .  .  .

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The Outer Limits of Reason: What Science, Mathematics, and Logic Cannot Tell Us The MIT Press

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The MIT Press #ad - This book investigates what cannot be known. Exploring the various limitations of our knowledge, he shows that many of these limitations have a similar pattern and that by investigating these patterns, we can better understand the structure and limitations of reason itself. Rather than exploring the amazing facts that science, and reason have revealed to us, mathematics, mathematics, this work studies what science, and reason tell us cannot be revealed.

In the outer limits of reason, described, or known, Noson Yanofsky considers what cannot be predicted, and what will never be understood. He discusses the limitations of computers, logic, physics, and our own thought processes. Yanofsky describes simple tasks that would take computers trillions of centuries to complete and other problems that computers can never solve; perfectly formed English sentences that make no sense; different levels of infinity; the bizarre world of the quantum; the relevance of relativity theory; the causes of chaos theory; math problems that cannot be solved by normal means; and statements that are true but cannot be proven.

The Outer Limits of Reason: What Science, Mathematics, and Logic Cannot Tell Us The MIT Press #ad - Yanofsky even attempts to look beyond the borders of reason to see what, if anything, is out there. He explains the limitations of our intuitions about the world—our ideas about space, and motion, time, and the complex relationship between the knower and the known. Moving from the concrete to the abstract, from problems of everyday language to straightforward philosophical questions to the formalities of physics and mathematics, Yanofsky demonstrates a myriad of unsolvable problems and paradoxes.

An exploration of the scientific limits of knowledge that challenges our deep-seated beliefs about our universe, our rationality, and ourselves.

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The Joy of x: A Guided Tour of Math, from One to Infinity

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Eamon Dolan/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt #ad - Easily digestible chapters include plenty of helpful examples and illustrations. Discussing pop culture, art, and business, medicine, law, philosophy, Strogatz is the math teacher you wish you’d had. But math plays a part in all of our lives all of the time, whether we know it or not. In the joy of x, insight, with wit, steven Strogatz expands on his hit New York Times series to explain the big ideas of math gently and clearly, and brilliant illustrations.

The Joy of x: A Guided Tour of Math, from One to Infinity #ad - Delightful. You'll never forget the pythagorean theorem again!”—Scientific American Many people take math in high school and promptly forget much of it. Whether he is illuminating how often you should flip your mattress to get the maximum lifespan from it, or determining how many people you should date before settling down, explaining just how Google searches the internet, Strogatz shows how math connects to every aspect of life.

. Whether you aced integral calculus or aren’t sure what an integer is, you’ll find profound wisdom and persistent delight in The Joy of x.

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Zero: The Biography of a Dangerous Idea

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Penguin Books #ad - Popular math at its most entertaining and enlightening. Here are the legendary thinkers—from pythagoras to Newton to Heisenberg, from the Kabalists to today's astrophysicists—who have tried to understand it and whose clashes shook the foundations of philosophy, science, mathematics, and religion. Now it threatens the foundations of modern physics.

Today, zero lies at the heart of one of the biggest scientific controversies of all time: the quest for a theory of everything. Zero has pitted east against west and faith against reason, and its intransigence persists in the dark core of a black hole and the brilliant flash of the Big Bang. For zero, infinity's twin, is not like other numbers.

Zero: The Biography of a Dangerous Idea #ad - Zero is really something"-Washington PostA New York Times Notable Book. The babylonians invented it, the Greeks banned it, the Hindus worshiped it, and the Church used it to fend off heretics. For centuries the power of zero savored of the demonic; once harnessed, it became the most important tool in mathematics.

It is both nothing and everything. In zero, science journalist charles seife follows this innocent-looking number from its birth as an Eastern philosophical concept to its struggle for acceptance in Europe, its rise and transcendence in the West, and its ever-present threat to modern physics.

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The Pea and the Sun: A Mathematical Paradox

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A K Peters/CRC Press #ad - The Pea and the Sun: A Mathematical Paradox #ad - Take an apple and cut it into five pieces. Would you believe that these five pieces can be reassembled in such a fashion so as to create two apples equal in shape and size to the original? Would you believe that you could make something as large as the sun by breaking a pea into a finite number of pieces and putting it back together again? Neither.

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Prime Obsession: Bernhard Riemann and the Greatest Unsolved Problem in Mathematics

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Joseph Henry Press #ad - Not just a story of numbers and calculations, Prime Obsession is the engrossing tale of a relentless hunt for an elusive proof — and those who have been consumed by it. Is the hypothesis true or false?riemann's basic inquiry, the primary topic of his paper, concerned a straightforward but nevertheless important matter of arithmetic — defining a precise formula to track and identify the occurrence of prime numbers.

The making and breaking of modern codes, which depend on the properties of the prime numbers, have roots in the Hypothesis. Brilliant for its clarity, astounding for its potential consequences, the Hypothesis took on enormous importance in mathematics. In a series of extraordinary developments during the 1970s, it emerged that even the physics of the atomic nucleus is connected in ways not yet fully understood to this strange conundrum.

Proving or disproving it became the greatest challenge of the age. It has become clear that the riemann Hypothesis, whose resolution seems to hang tantalizingly just beyond our grasp, holds the key to a variety of scientific and mathematical investigations. Because riemann was able to see beyond the pattern of the primes to discern traces of something mysterious and mathematically elegant shrouded in the shadows — subtle variations in the distribution of those prime numbers.

Prime Obsession: Bernhard Riemann and the Greatest Unsolved Problem in Mathematics #ad - In august 1859 bernhard riemann, a little-known 32-year old mathematician, presented a paper to the Berlin Academy titled: "On the Number of Prime Numbers Less Than a Given Quantity. In the middle of that paper, Riemann made an incidental remark — a guess, a hypothesis. Today, after 150 years of careful research and exhaustive study, the question remains.

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Measurement

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Harvard University Press #ad - Lockhart’s mathematician’s Lament outlined how we introduce math to students in the wrong way. With plain english and pictures, he makes complex ideas about shape and motion intuitive and graspable, and offers a solution to math phobia by introducing us to math as an artful way of thinking and living.

Measurement #ad - Measurement explains how math should be done.

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Can You Solve My Problems?: Ingenious, Perplexing, and Totally Satisfying Math and Logic Puzzles

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The Experiment #ad - Can You Solve My Problems?: Ingenious, Perplexing, and Totally Satisfying Math and Logic Puzzles #ad - Armed with logic alone, you’ll detect counterfeit coins, navigate river crossings, and untangle family trees. Puzzle lovers, rejoice! bestselling math writer Alex Bellos has a challenge for you: 125 of the world’s best brainteasers from the last two millennia. Then—with just a dash of high school math—you’ll tie a rope around the Earth, match wits with a cryptic wizard, and use four 4s to create every number from 1 to 50

Grab your pencil and get puzzling! It can be done! the ultimate casebook for daring puzzlers, Can You Solve My Problems? also tells the story of the puzzle—from ancient China to Victorian England to modern-day Japan.

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Prelude to Mathematics Dover Books on Mathematics

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Dover Publications #ad - No mathematician can be a complete mathematician unless he is also something of a poet. K. Weierstrassin this lively and stimulating account, noted mathematician and educator W. Indeed, mathematics seems to have few boundaries, either in applications to practical matters or in its mind-stretching excursions into realms of pure abstraction.

Gearing his approach to the layman whose grasp of things mathematical may be a bit precarious, Professor Sawyer offers a lucid, accessible introduction to the mathematician's cast of mind. The emphasis here is not on mathematics with great practical utility, the apparently impossible — for example, the novel, but on those branches which are exciting in themselves — mathematics which offers the strange, an arithmetic in which no number is larger than four.

Prelude to Mathematics Dover Books on Mathematics #ad - Mathematicians will appreciate the author's grasp of a wide range of important mathematical topics, and his ability to illuminate the complex issues involved; laymen, which affords not only a portrait of mathematics as a matchless tool for probing the nature of the universe, especially those with a minimal math background, will appreciate the accessibility of much of the book, but a revealing glimpse of that mysterious entity called "the mathematical mind.

Professor sawyer has further enhanced this new Dover edition with updated material on group theory, appearing here in English for the first time. Sawyer professor emeritus, University of Toronto defines mathematics as "the classification and study of all possible patterns. It is a broad definition, but one that seems appropriate to the great scope and depth of the topic.

W. Five well-written preliminary chapters explore the beauty, power and mysticism of mathematics; the role of math as an adjunct in utilitarian matters; and the concepts of pattern, generalization and unification as both tools and goals of mathematical thought.

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